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Sepsis Facts
Sepsis is common and often deadly. It remains the primary cause of death from infection, despite advances in modern medicine like vaccines, antibiotics, and intensive care.
FAQs
Over the past year we've been collecting the questions we receive most frequently about sepsis. Please share this information with your friends and family. Don’t see your question on the list? Get in touch with us, and we’ll do our best to help.
Suspect sepsis
If you, a relative, or a patient feels "severely sick", "that something is wrong", or "are not yourself", and shows any of the following symptoms, you should suspect sepsis:
How to prevent sepsis
Sepsis is always caused by an infection, most often by bacteria, but sometimes by fungi or protozoa (such as malaria). That means that preventing infection is one of the best ways to prevent sepsis.
Pat*, athelete, survived sepsis at the age of 32
My illness started on 20 May 2004. I felt great that day, but in the evening suddenly developed a fever and chills.
Life after Sepsis: an international survey
After surviving an acute phase of sepsis, a patient may continue to struggle with a long list of serious symptoms. The extent of these complications varies…
Thea* survived sepsis at the age of 7 months
Today, Thea is approaching her fourth birthday. She has an identical twin and two other young sisters.
What is sepsis
Pat had a pneumococcus sepsis because he lost his spleen after a car accident as a teenager. He experienced multiple organ failure, followed by critical illness polyneuropathy.