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About us
The World Sepsis Day wouldn’t be possible without the dedicated work of many individuals and organizations.
World Sepsis Day is an initiative of the Global Sepsis Alliance and its founding members, all of whom are non-profit organizations.

We in the Global Sepsis Alliance have come together to increase public and professional awareness of sepsis - a problem that is common, global in scope, and devastating in its consequences. The devastating impact of sepsis we have witnessed is what has led us to initiate World Sepsis Day. We know the toll of sepsis can be reduced, but we recognize that a major barrier to success lies in the fact that sepsis is largely unknown to the public, and poorly understood by professionals. Too many people develop sepsis. Too few survive. We are going to change this.

World Sepsis Day is an initiative of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA), which was founded by a caring group of non-profit organizations:

The World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine (WFSICCM)
www.world-critical-care.org


The World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies (WFPICCS)
www.wfpiccs.org


The World Federation of Critical Care Nurses (WFCCN)
en.wfccn.org


The International Sepsis Forum (ISF)
sepsisforum.org


The Sepsis Alliance (SA)
www.sepsisalliance.org


American Academy of Pediatrics
www.aap.org

FAQs
Over the past year we've been collecting the questions we receive most frequently about sepsis. Please share this information with your friends and family. Don’t see your question on the list? Get in touch with us, and we’ll do our best to help.
How we are organized
World Sepsis Day, 13 September, is an initiative of the Global Sepsis Alliance and its founding members, all of whom are non-profit organizations.
Sepsis Facts
Sepsis is common and often deadly. It remains the primary cause of death from infection, despite advances in modern medicine like vaccines, antibiotics, and intensive care.
What is sepsis
Pat had a pneumococcus sepsis because he lost his spleen after a car accident as a teenager. He experienced multiple organ failure, followed by critical illness polyneuropathy.
How to prevent sepsis
Sepsis is always caused by an infection, most often by bacteria, but sometimes by fungi or protozoa (such as malaria). That means that preventing infection is one of the best ways to prevent sepsis.